24 October 2014

Fwd: civil war snowball fight -- 10/24/14



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Begin forwarded message:

From: delanceyplace <daily@delanceyplace.com>
Date: October 24, 2014 at 03:52:37 EDT
To: mseymour@proofmark.com
Subject: civil war snowball fight -- 10/24/14
Reply-To: daily@delanceyplace.com

delanceyplace header

Today's selection -- from Rebel Yell by S.C. Gwynne. For the soldier, the American Civil War was the most grim and devastating of all the American wars. 600,000 soldiers died, the most in any American war, and regiments often lost the majority of their men in a single day -- Minié balls tearing through their flesh at close range and unattached arms and legs stacked in piles in the aftermath of the battle. Winter was a respite from the horror, and the passage below describes the lives of these soldiers camped in Virginia in the brief, quiet interlude between the terrifying battles of 1862 and 1863. There was an unforgettable moment when 150,000 soldiers from the two opposing armies directly across the Rappahannock River from each other joined together in song: 

 

"Though there were duties to keep the men busy that winter -- drilling, as always, the occasional review, the building of defensive works on the high ground of the south bank, and the usual run of camp chores -- there was also a good deal of free time. ...


"Mostly that winter there was just talking, a lot of it, in the tents, around campfires, on long walks and rides that their lessened duties now afforded them. ...

"Private soldiers seemed ... swept up in this new, lighthearted feeling. In December they built a theater out of logs and clapboard and staged amazingly elaborate performances every night, a combination of variety shows and burlesques on officers, quartermasters, and commissaries. In one a soldier is told that his head wound would require his head to be amputated. He replies that at least then he will be able to get a furlough, only to be told that his headless body is needed as a decoy to fool the enemy. 

"The grandest show of all took place in February, put on by the Washington Artillery with music by the 12th and 16th Mississippi Regiments. Programs were printed in Richmond, and people came from twenty miles around to see it. Though Lee sent a letter of regret, Longstreet and other generals attended in full dress. The main feature was titled Pocahontas or Ye Gentle Savage, which brought the house down several times. The show concluded with a thumping rendition of 'Bonnie Blue Flag.' (A month later a group of soldiers quartered near Fredericksburg put on an all-male burlesque in which one of the principal actors completely disrobed.)

"Probably the most fun the soldiers had that winter were the snowball fights. Many of them had never seen snow before. Now there was lots of it, and they knew just what to do. Every time it snowed -- which was frequently -- there were battles, usually involving small groups of soldiers. But on at least one occasion they mounted a fight on a massive scale. Two armies were formed, of 2,500 men each, complete with authentic generals, colors, signal corps, fifers and drummers beating the long roll, couriers, and cavalry. They conducted head-on assaults and flank attacks. There were probably demands under flags of truce, and fortifications everywhere. 'It was probibly the greatest snowball battle ever fought,' wrote one participant, and showed that 'men are but children of larger growth .... ' If all battles would terminate that way it would be a great improvement on the old slaughtering plan.' Robert E. Lee, who came out to observe the battle, was struck by several snowballs. The Richmond newspapers each devoted several columns to accounts of the fight.



"The sweetest and saddest moment of this dreamy season came one evening when several Union bands appeared on the northern bank of the Rappahannock to play some favorites, songs such as 'When This Cruel War Is Over' (by far the most popular), 'Tenting Tonight on the Old Campground,' 'John Brown's Body,' and 'The Battle Cry of Freedom.' Thousands of soldiers in groups on the hillside sang along while the rebels listened. Finally the Confederates called out across the river, 'Now play one of ors!' Without missing a beat the Yankee bands pitched into 'Dixie,' 'Bonnie Blue Flag,' and 'Maryland, My Maryland.' They ended the concert by playing 'Home Sweet Home,' with 150,000 men on both sides choking up as they sang it." 

 

 

Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson
Author: S. C. Gwynne
Publisher Scribner a Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.
Copyright 2014 by Samuel C. Gwynne
Pages: 511-513

 

If you wish to read further: Buy Now
 

 

 

 

If you use the above link to purchase a book, delanceyplace proceeds from your purchase will benefit a children's literacy project. All delanceyplace profits are donated to charity. 

Red


About Us

Delanceyplace is a brief daily email with an excerpt or quote we view as interesting or noteworthy, offered with commentary to provide context.  There is no theme, except that most excerpts will come from a non-fiction work, mainly works of history, are occasionally controversial, and we hope will have a more universal relevance than simply the subject of the book from which they came. 

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BBC - Autos - Nine dead motorbike names revived for the 21st century

http://www.bbc.com/autos/story/20141023-rockets-from-the-crypt?ocid=global_bbccom_email_24102014_autos


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BBC - Future - How ‘crowd patronage’ could shape music and art

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Jim Thorpe's body to remain in Pa.

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/local/20141024_Jim_Thorpe_s_body_to_remain_in_Pa_.html?nlid=7773062


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NYPD Officers Shoot And Kill Man Who Attacked Them With a Hatchet | TIME

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Apple 1 goes under the hammer for world record price | ZDNet

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An ode to Apple's fading iPod: It begat the iPhone | ZDNet

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Sweden submarine search called off - BBC News

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Indictment: Narc cops dangled man over 18-story balcony

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History for the day


On 24 October 1945, the United Nations charter took effect.

Fwd: civil war snowball fight -- 10/24/14



Sent from my iPhone

Mark Seymour
215.866.6184

Begin forwarded message:

From: delanceyplace <daily@delanceyplace.com>
Date: October 24, 2014 at 03:52:37 EDT
To: mseymour@proofmark.com
Subject: civil war snowball fight -- 10/24/14
Reply-To: daily@delanceyplace.com

delanceyplace header

Today's selection -- from Rebel Yell by S.C. Gwynne. For the soldier, the American Civil War was the most grim and devastating of all the American wars. 600,000 soldiers died, the most in any American war, and regiments often lost the majority of their men in a single day -- Minié balls tearing through their flesh at close range and unattached arms and legs stacked in piles in the aftermath of the battle. Winter was a respite from the horror, and the passage below describes the lives of these soldiers camped in Virginia in the brief, quiet interlude between the terrifying battles of 1862 and 1863. There was an unforgettable moment when 150,000 soldiers from the two opposing armies directly across the Rappahannock River from each other joined together in song: 

 

"Though there were duties to keep the men busy that winter -- drilling, as always, the occasional review, the building of defensive works on the high ground of the south bank, and the usual run of camp chores -- there was also a good deal of free time. ...


"Mostly that winter there was just talking, a lot of it, in the tents, around campfires, on long walks and rides that their lessened duties now afforded them. ...

"Private soldiers seemed ... swept up in this new, lighthearted feeling. In December they built a theater out of logs and clapboard and staged amazingly elaborate performances every night, a combination of variety shows and burlesques on officers, quartermasters, and commissaries. In one a soldier is told that his head wound would require his head to be amputated. He replies that at least then he will be able to get a furlough, only to be told that his headless body is needed as a decoy to fool the enemy. 

"The grandest show of all took place in February, put on by the Washington Artillery with music by the 12th and 16th Mississippi Regiments. Programs were printed in Richmond, and people came from twenty miles around to see it. Though Lee sent a letter of regret, Longstreet and other generals attended in full dress. The main feature was titled Pocahontas or Ye Gentle Savage, which brought the house down several times. The show concluded with a thumping rendition of 'Bonnie Blue Flag.' (A month later a group of soldiers quartered near Fredericksburg put on an all-male burlesque in which one of the principal actors completely disrobed.)

"Probably the most fun the soldiers had that winter were the snowball fights. Many of them had never seen snow before. Now there was lots of it, and they knew just what to do. Every time it snowed -- which was frequently -- there were battles, usually involving small groups of soldiers. But on at least one occasion they mounted a fight on a massive scale. Two armies were formed, of 2,500 men each, complete with authentic generals, colors, signal corps, fifers and drummers beating the long roll, couriers, and cavalry. They conducted head-on assaults and flank attacks. There were probably demands under flags of truce, and fortifications everywhere. 'It was probibly the greatest snowball battle ever fought,' wrote one participant, and showed that 'men are but children of larger growth .... ' If all battles would terminate that way it would be a great improvement on the old slaughtering plan.' Robert E. Lee, who came out to observe the battle, was struck by several snowballs. The Richmond newspapers each devoted several columns to accounts of the fight.



"The sweetest and saddest moment of this dreamy season came one evening when several Union bands appeared on the northern bank of the Rappahannock to play some favorites, songs such as 'When This Cruel War Is Over' (by far the most popular), 'Tenting Tonight on the Old Campground,' 'John Brown's Body,' and 'The Battle Cry of Freedom.' Thousands of soldiers in groups on the hillside sang along while the rebels listened. Finally the Confederates called out across the river, 'Now play one of ors!' Without missing a beat the Yankee bands pitched into 'Dixie,' 'Bonnie Blue Flag,' and 'Maryland, My Maryland.' They ended the concert by playing 'Home Sweet Home,' with 150,000 men on both sides choking up as they sang it." 

 

 

Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson
Author: S. C. Gwynne
Publisher Scribner a Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.
Copyright 2014 by Samuel C. Gwynne
Pages: 511-513

 

If you wish to read further: Buy Now
 

 

 

 

If you use the above link to purchase a book, delanceyplace proceeds from your purchase will benefit a children's literacy project. All delanceyplace profits are donated to charity. 

Red


About Us

Delanceyplace is a brief daily email with an excerpt or quote we view as interesting or noteworthy, offered with commentary to provide context.  There is no theme, except that most excerpts will come from a non-fiction work, mainly works of history, are occasionally controversial, and we hope will have a more universal relevance than simply the subject of the book from which they came. 

To visit our homepage or sign up for our daily email click here
To view previous daily emails click here.
To sign up for our daily email click here.
Forward email



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23 October 2014

Chinese reinvent the umbrella


Rachel Zarrell has a BuzzFeed article about a new version of an old device:
A team of Chinese designers has invented a new kind of umbrella for the person sick of lugging around a soggy one: the Air Umbrella, which uses a “force field of air” to keep you dry.
But the slightly devious invention doesn’t just prevent you from getting wet; it also propels the rain into a three-foot canopy, likely onto unsuspecting passersby. You’ll be the hit of the sidewalk! (Don’t quote me on that.)
“If nearby pedestrians do not take their own umbrella, they will be affected more or less, but they will get wet in a rainy day if they haven't taken an umbrella anyway,” creator Chuan Wang said.
The umbrella has been a huge hit on Kickstarter, where it raised eight times the creators’ goal of $10,000; the fundraiser still has four days left.
Wang said that the Air Umbrella was designed with post-graduates from the Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, who worked from July of 2012 to August of 2013 to perfect the prototype.
The device, weighing less than two pounds, works with a motor and a fan, and is powered by a lithium battery. The fan creates a cycle of air that flows through the umbrella’s tip, deflecting drops and forming a protective layer around the user. Apparently two people can fit under the umbrella; more, if it’s not raining heavily. Though, much like a regular umbrella, intense wind can render the umbrella useless. “When the speed of wind reaches a certain level, not even the umbrella you are using now is useful, and neither is the air umbrella,” Wang wrote.
And, unfortunately, the futuristic umbrella needs to be charged for thirty to sixty minutes for about fifteen to thirty minutes of use, depending on the model. That's useful from the house to the subway, but not so much in a downpour. The creators said they hope that, with the money raised, the battery life will be improved by the time the umbrella is released.
If all goes well, production is expected to begin in September of 2015, with the new toy delivered by December of 2015.
Rico says it cries out for a big solar cell on top to keep it running...

Idiot for the day


Rico's friend Dave forwards this article by Mark Molloy in The Telegraph:
A woman looking for her soulmate found herself trapped in the chimney of a man she met through an online dating site. Genoveva Nunez-Figueroa, thirty, was rescued by a team of firefighters after attempting to enter the man’s home in Los Angeles, California on Sunday, police say. Neighbors alerted authorities after the soot-covered intruder became stuck and started screaming for help.
The whole rescue operation was live-tweeted by Captain Mike Lindbery from the Ventura County Fire Department. Firefighters carefully removed bricks to reach the woman, and then used dishwashing soap to lubricate the chimney so she could be safely lifted out.
Homeowner Lawrence Fernandez said the pair had been on six dates before he broke things off. "She seemed totally cool until the first flag was her actually being on my roof two weeks ago,” he told KTLA. “Having someone in your chimney is like kind of a weird thing you wouldn’t expect to come home to,” he explained to CBS LA. “It wasn’t Santa Claus, that's for sure.” He added: “You have to be careful who you meet online.”
Nunez-Figueroa was arrested for illegal entry and providing false information to an officer.
Rico says yet another reason not to use on-line dating...

White House for the day


Jon Passantino has a Buzzfeed article about yet another intruder:
The White House was briefly placed on lockdown after a man scaled a perimeter fence and was captured by agents on the North Lawn while President Obama sat just yards away inside the residence.
The Secret Service said 23-year-old Dominic Adesanya, of Bel Air, Maryland, was taken into custody after being stopped by guard dogs and agents on the White House lawn around seven pm. Video from the scene appeared to show the man kicking and punching a dog during the confrontation. The day before he was arrested for scaling the White House fence, he posted this image of himself on Instagram:
 
Adesanya, who was unarmed, was later transported to a hospital with dog bite injuries. Charges against him include felony assault; making threats, also a felony; and unlawful entry, a misdemeanor, Secret Service spokesman Brian Leary said.
The two Secret Service dogs involved in the incident were taken to a veterinarian for their injuries. Video showed Adesanya kicking and punching a Secret Service dog on the White House lawn before being taken into custody.
The cause of the incident was not immediately known, and comes in the wake of an incident last month where 42-year-old Omar Gonzalez scaled the fence and made it inside the White House before being apprehended. The security breach ultimately resulted in the resignation of Secret Service Director Julia Pearson.
Rico says the next guy should get shot for kicking the poor dogs...

Burt for the day

Rico says you have to endure spitting for quite awhile (sorry), but eventually you get to see the movie, Vengeance Valley:



No spitting, except for blood, in Valdez Is Coming:

MiB for the day

Rico says he can't resist, 'cause he loves these movies:



Paris underground


The New York Times has an article by Aurelian Breeden about things you don't see below your feet, if you're in Paris:
On a recent evening, a thirty-year-old street artist led a small group through a dark tunnel off a disused train track in the south of Paris. After crouching, crawling, and sometimes wading through water, using headlamps to light their way, they finally arrived in a chamber with vaulted ceilings about ten feet high.
The space was once used by a brewery to store bottles. It is now part of a sprawling network of abandoned galleries below the city, where a secretive community of street artists, history buffs, and other Parisians regularly prowl. They are sometimes called cataphiles: lovers of the catacombs, as the subterranean network is commonly known.
Some seek peace and quiet from the bustling city, others an unusual canvas for their art, still others a place to party with friends at a lower cost and in a more jovial atmosphere than in the clubs and bars above. Many cherish the secrecy and, to some extent, exclusivity of their endeavors.
“My creations have a lot more value here, because they are intended for a limited audience that deserves to see them,” said the artist who led the group and declined to give his name, but went by Nobad. “They went through the trouble of coming here.”
Nobad stencils European paintings with a twist, like Gustave Courbet’s Desperate Man in glow-in-the-dark paint. But the walls are covered with art, including paintings in the style of Egyptian tomb murals, grimacing black and orange devil faces, a giant multicolored parrot, and an abundance of graffiti. In one room, the walls are encrusted with mirror shards, and a glittering disco ball hangs from the ceiling.
The term “catacombs” designates only a small part of this vast underground network, the fraction where the remains of six million Parisians were transferred in the 1780s from several of the city’s overflowing and unsanitary cemeteries. That ossuary is one of the rare parts of the network legally open to the public and has become a popular tourist attraction.
But the bulk of the network— nearly two hundred miles of tunnels and other chambers— has been off-limits to legal passage since 1955, and is a legacy of early quarrying in Paris. That is where the cataphiles roam.
“The connection with the underground is hard to explain because it is visceral,” said Gilles Thomas, a municipal employee whose thirty years of passion and research on the topic have made him an expert. “Whatever their interest, the people who have this very deep-rooted attraction to the underground disconnect themselves from reality on the surface.” The Romans were the first to mine outcrops of limestone for construction purposes, mainly on the Left Bank of the Seine, Thomas said. That activity was pushed underground in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries to avoid ruining precious topsoil in what, at the time, were the agricultural outskirts of the city.
“It’s the period when the Notre-Dame Cathedral was being built, for instance, and a tremendous amount of stone was needed,” said Thomas, who is regularly consulted by novelists and film directors who want to feature Paris’ underbelly in their work.
Paris quickly expanded over the former quarries. In the late eighteenth century, after a series of spectacular and deadly cave-ins, the King ordered that buildings be consolidated and that the forgotten underground quarries be mapped. Old streets that were razed during nineteenth-century renovations still exist as tunnels below, however, creating a historical carbon copy of the city that once existed above, Thomas said.
Today some passages still contain relics of the French Revolution, like chiseled royal fleurs-de-lis on street signs. Several World War Two-era bomb shelters are also connected to the network. During the German occupation one was outfitted with living quarters for sixty people, but was never used.
Today, trespassers risk a sixty-euro fine if they stumble upon the police units that sometimes patrol underground. Risks to the explorers include getting injured from falling rocks, losing your bearings in the dark maze, or drowning in deep wells. In 2011, three friends got lost after partying and drinking underground, and were found two days later.
“We were very paternalistic; all we wanted was to avoid accidents,” said Jean-Claude Saratte, a retired police commander who started the first patrols in the 1980s and led them for twenty years. “Ninety to ninety-five percent of the time, all we did was reprimand people.”
It is hard to say how many people venture underground each year; though those familiar with the network say there is a core of about a hundred regulars. But cataphiles say that there has been an increase in the number of “tourists”, newcomers who visit, often unprepared. Some worry that these new visitors are not respectful of the art or history below. “Defacing has worsened because of the Facebook phenomenon,” which has made reproducing and sharing maps of the network even easier than the photocopier had in the 1980s, Thomas said. In one room, a painted reproduction of Picasso’s Guernica had been covered over with graffiti.
Information on where to find entrances to the underground is still a fiercely kept secret, and sharing them with outsiders is a taboo, according a biology research technician in her thirties (who would not give her name) who became a cataphile five years ago.
But the overall spirit below is welcoming, and many find a sense of community and equality that supersedes whatever hierarchies exist on the surface. “We are here for the same passion and we share the same things, regardless of what we are above,” said Gaspard Duval, a cataphile in his forties who discovered the network six years ago and comes down several times a week, mainly for photography. “No one cares about your social class.”
On a recent evening, in the former brewery cellar, people gathered around a table made with piled slabs of rock. The white fluorescent light from headlamps was replaced by soft candlelight as they lit cigarettes and passed around ham or chocolate.
One man heated a can of beans on a portable gas heater. Throughout the underground maze, cataphiles have sparsely furnished several chambers like this one with stone benches and tables to rest and socialize after exploring the tunnels.
“You can’t be judged on your appearance because we are all dirty with mud and wearing boots,” said a pastel artist who gave her name only as Misti, on another outing. “So the banker and the punk, they party together.”
Rico says it's not how he'll see Paris, if he can only win the damn lottery...

Boating

video

Rico says the video is of his father, lounging in our stateroom during our recent boat trip to New England...

The world loved the swastika until Hitler stole it


The BBC has an article about German history:
In the Western world, the swastika is synonymous with fascism, but it goes back thousands of years, and has been used as a symbol of good fortune in almost every culture in the world. As more evidence emerges of its long pre-Nazi history in Europe, can this ancient sign ever shake off its evil associations?
In the ancient Indian language of Sanskrit, swastika means "well-being". The symbol has been used by Hindus, Buddhists, and Jains for millennia, and is commonly assumed to be an Indian sign.
Early Western travelers to Asia were inspired by its positive and ancient associations and started using it back home (photos, above). By the beginning of the twentieth century there was a huge fad for the swastika as a benign good luck symbol.
In his book The Swastika: Symbol Beyond Redemption?, graphic design writer Steven Heller shows how it was enthusiastically adopted in the West as an architectural motif, on advertising and product design. "Coca-Cola used it. Carlsberg used it on their beer bottles. The Boy Scouts adopted it, and the Girls' Club of America called their magazine Swastika. They would even send out swastika badges to their young readers as a prize for selling copies of the magazine," he says.
It was used by American military units during World War One (photo) and it could be seen on RAF planes as late as 1939. Most of these benign uses came to a halt in the 1930s as the Nazis rose to power in Germany.
The Nazi use of the swastika stems from the work of nineteenth century German scholars translating old Indian texts, who noticed similarities between their own language and Sanskrit. They concluded that Indians and Germans must have had a shared ancestry, and imagined a race of white god-like warriors they called Aryans. This idea was seized upon by anti-Semitic nationalist groups, who appropriated the swastika as an Aryan symbol to boost a sense of ancient lineage for the Germanic people.
The black straight-armed hakenkreuz (hooked cross) on the distinctive white circle and red background of the Nazi flag would become the most hated symbol of the twentieth century, inextricably linked to the atrocities committed under the Third Reich.
"For the Jewish people, the swastika is a symbol of fear, of suppression, and of extermination. It's a symbol that we will never ever be able to change," says Holocaust survivor Freddie Knoller. "If they put the swastika on gravestones or synagogues, it puts a fear into us. Surely it shouldn't happen again."
The swastika was banned in Germany at the end of the war, and Germany tried unsuccessfully to introduce an EU-wide ban in 2007. The irony is that the swastika is more European in origin than most people realize. Archaeological finds have long demonstrated that the swastika is a very old symbol, but ancient examples are by no means limited to India. It was used by the Ancient Greeks, Celts, and Anglo-Saxons, and some of the oldest examples have been found in Eastern Europe, from the Baltic to the Balkans .
If you want to see just how deeply rooted the swastika pattern is in Europe, a good place to start is Kiev in the Ukraine, where the National Museum of the History of the Ukraine has an impressive range of exhibits. Among the museum's most highly prized treasures is a small ivory figurine of a female bird. Made from the tusk of a mammoth, it was found in 1908 at the Palaeolithic settlement of Mezin near the Russian border. On the torso of the bird is engraved an intricate meander pattern of joined-up swastikas. It's the oldest identified swastika pattern in the world, and has been radio carbon-dated to an astonishing fifteen thousand years ago. The bird was found with a number of phallic objects, which supports the idea that the swastika pattern was used as a fertility symbol.
In 1965, a palaeontologist called Valentina Bibikova discovered that the swastika meander pattern on the bird is very similar to the naturally-occurring pattern visible on a cross-section of ivory. Could it be that the Palaeolithic makers of the figurine were simply reflecting what they saw in nature: the huge mammoth they associated with well-being and fertility?
Single swastikas began to appear in the Neolithic Vinca culture across south-eastern Europe around seven thousand years ago. But it's in the Bronze Age that they became more widespread across the whole of Europe. In the Museum's collection there are clay pots with single swastikas encircling their upper half which date back to around four thousand years ago. When the Nazis occupied Kiev during World War Two, they were so convinced that these pots were evidence of their own Aryan ancestors that they took them back to Germany. (They were returned after the war.)
In the Museum's Grecian collection, the swastika is visible as the architectural ornament which has come to be known as the Greek key pattern, widely used on tiles and textiles to this day. The Ancient Greeks also used single swastika motifs to decorate their pots and vases. One fragment in the collection from around the seventh century BCE shows a swastika with limbs like unfurling tendrils painted under the belly of a goat.
Perhaps the most surprising exhibit in the museum is of fragile textile fragments that have survived from the twelfth century. They are believed to belong to the dress collar of a Slav princess (photo, above), embroidered with gold crosses and swastikas to ward off evil. The swastika remained a popular embroidery motif in Eastern Europe and Russia right up to World War Two. A Russian author, Pavel Kutenkov, has identified nearly two hundred variations across the region. But the hakenkreuz remains a highly charged symbol. In 1941, Kiev was the site of one of the worst Nazi mass murders of the Holocaust, when over thirty thousand Jews were rounded up and killed at the ravine of Babi Yar.
In Western Europe, the use of indigenous ancient swastikas petered out long before the modern era, but examples can be found in many places, such as the famous Bronze Age Swastika Stone on Ilkley Moor in Yorkshire in England.
Some people think this long history can help revive the symbol in Europe as something positive. Peter Madsen, owner of an upmarket tattoo parlor in Copenhagen, Denmark, says the swastika is an element of Norse mythology that holds a strong appeal to many Scandinavians. He is one of the founders of last year's Learn to Love the Swastika Day on 13 November, when tattoo artists around the world offered free swastikas to raise awareness of the symbol's long multicultural past. "The swastika is a symbol of love and Hitler abused it. We're not trying to reclaim the hakenkreuz. That would be impossible. Nor is it something we want people to forget," he says. "We just want people to know that the swastika comes in many other forms, none of which have ever been used for anything bad. We are also trying to show the right-wing fascists that it's wrong to use this symbol. If we can educate the public about the true meanings of the swastika, maybe we can take it away from the fascists."
But for those like Freddie Knoller, who have experienced the horrors of fascism, the prospect of learning to love the swastika is not so easy. "For the people who went through the Holocaust, we will always remember what the swastika was like in our life: a symbol of pure evil," he says. "We didn't know how the symbol dates back so many thousands of years ago. But I think it's interesting for people to learn that the swastika was not always the symbol of fascism."
Rico says you have to look close at the top photo to realize it's not a Nazi plane, but he doesn't see the swastika making a comeback...
 

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